Review: BoomBox @The Bluebird w/Signal Path—2/21/13


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There aren’t many duos that can put out such amazingly funky music which is also so minimalistic, but BoomBox does just that. The disco house duo features Zion Godchaux (electric guitar, vocals) and Russ Randolph (production). Equally as remarkable as the sound of BoomBox’s music is the sweet and sultry sound of Godchaux’s voice. The group coupled with the dance invoking fusion rock group Signal Path caused so many wonderful people to disregard their own personal safeties and travel considerable distances during such an awful snow/ice storm. Anticipation for the evening rested with the notion of a night of a fun and funky dance party. This was admittedly my first time seeing Signal Path, but from the beginning it was obvious the electronic rock group had exceeded my expectations, causing quite a ruckus amidst the sparsely crowded venue.

Signal Path was truly an amazing opener, creating pleasantly crafted electronic rock dance grooves. Even more remarkable, the group was able to keep the music sounding seemingly improvised while keeping the music tightly held together. The highlight of their set came while noticing bass player Matt Schumacher switching from a normal electric bass to an upright electric bass, a rarity for me to see in my live music endeavors. One might think this transition wouldn’t make a difference, but I assure you it made a huge difference with Signal Path’s music. Also strengthening the group’s set was the incredibly simplistic yet effective play by drummer Damon Metzner. These two combined with production to create crisply sounding fusion rock. The group had an uncanny ability to fuse the sound of hip hop, EDM, and rock & roll into such an incredible cocktail of music. I was honestly blown away as their set came to a close. Signal Path is surely a band I will make a point to see in the future. Luckily it won’t be long and I won’t have to travel far, SP is set to return to Indiana March 29th for an Indy Mojo event at The Mousetrap Bar and Grill in Indianapolis.

After a brief intermission, BoomBox took the stage and attempted to wow the much larger crowd of fans. The music began, but to be perfectly honest the first half of their set started very slowly. I kept waiting for the duo to fully cut loose and they finally did during the song “Stereo”. The song seemed to instantaneously energize the crowd, sending concert goers into a dancing frenzy. Riding the wave of their musical prowess, they delivered again by playing “Midnight on the Run”. The song perfectly captured the essence of BoomBox’s sound, maintaining the funky dance grooves created by Randolph’s production and Godchaux’s guitar play to create seemingly naturalistic sounding music. It was obvious from the reception they received from the crowd that the duo had finally settled into their set of music.
The heart of the set came during the second half, which featured BoomBox relentlessly playing without stoppage. Pure joy enveloped my body when after just a couple of notes “Mr. Boogie Man” began to play. The fun and energetic song does wonders to my soul and perfectly highlighted Godchaux’s smoothly sounding voice. The song is admittedly one of my favorite BoomBox songs, always causing pure joy throughout my mind and body. Easily the highlight of the show was at the very end when they blasted the crowd with their rendition of The Grateful Dead’s “Shakedown Street”. Fans were presented with a funky and fresh eclectic version of the original of the Dead’s excellent song. As amazing as the original is, I find BoomBox’s interpretation of the song better than the original. The music ended, thus ending the incredible dance party. I found an amazing act I hadn’t seen before with Signal Path and reinvigorated my love for BoomBox. Also, I was left with the lasting impression that despite any adversity music lovers will go to great lengths to see the bands they love. Check out more photos from the show by Wide Aperture Images

Written by: Alex Toy

Photos by: Aaron Lingenfelter, Wide Aperture Images