This Friday from 6 to 9 pm, art gallery 5547 Project, located in Irvington, will be opening an Earth Day themed event for 18 local and emerging artists. These artists will get a chance to reveal their perspective of our planet Earth and share them with the world.

The all-age and pet friendly art show is a free event which will include live musical performances from Thea and Thieves, Wesley Moore and Katie Garringer. Along with live music, there will be a fire dancing show put on by Haley Challies and Sarah Hoffman. The event will also feature local businesses from Beast Irvington who will provide free appetizers, and free beer tasting from BIMP(Beer Is My Passion). Another local business, Smokey Meat Sweats will have food for purchase. And our team from Indy Mojo will be at the opening reception as well to promote Mojo Mongrels, their Humane Society Mutt Strut team. Puppy chow will be available for purchase.

5547 Project is a unique art gallery that has been open for about a year. The garage-turned-gallery has a coffee shop inside, Coal Yard Coffee – your one stop shop for a daily fix of caffeine and art all in one! The gallery’s comfortable atmosphere allows anyone to come in, look, discuss, and purchase artwork to support local artists and businesses any day of the week. 5547 Project wants to be all about the artist and do not receive commission for displayed work. After renting out a wall, the artist will receive all of their profit.

In addition to First Friday art exhibitions at the 5547 Project, Coal Yard Coffee hosts different events every Friday which include comedy, spoken word and open mic night. Come out and support your local artists and businesses in Irvington!

Earthworks First Friday Event

5547 Project (5547 Bonna Ave 46219)

Friday April 3, 6 – 9 PM

Hidden in the heart of Irvington on an unassuming side street, The 5547 Project is Indy’s newest haven for those seeking local art and music. Void of the pretentiousness of formal art galleries (and lofty price tags on the art), The 5547 Project puts arts-based community learning first.

Continuing in the tradition of Irvington’s strong communal mindset, the gallery aims to be a place where children can come to learn about art, artists and musicians. On top of investing in the next generation of creative souls, it’s a place for residents of Indianapolis to gather and admire art over a good cup of coffee and great conversation.

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Project 5547 has the same raw, industrial vibe as the large commercial building at 24th & Illinois that used to be home to Oranje, but makes it uniquely its own with shrewd use of a small, intimate space and an eclectic collection of avant garde art and repurposed objects.

Artville & Art Town

To kick off 2015, The 5547 Project partnered with The Stutz Gallery downtown to hold a Second Saturday showing in January, due to the fact that January’s first Friday fell right after the New Year. Free limo rides gave patrons a safe way to get to both events, seamlessly connecting Art Town in Irvington and Artville at The Stutz.

The change of scenery gave attendees the chance to hop from the cozy, intimate, DIY vibes of The 5547 Project to the more prim and conservative space at The Stutz. Both locations featured a variety of live music, but the most interesting performance I found was at Artville. Performing under the moniker Duck Trash, experimental singer/songwriter and cellist Hannah Groves turned conventional acoustic songs into beautifully bizarre, layered productions using nothing but her voice, a small handful of stringed instruments, and a loop machine.

February is shaping up to be just as exciting as January with a variety of events on the calendar – the first of which, titled “Love Lives Here,” will take place on February 6th and feature performances from Kayla Jo and Emily Myren, in addition to tons of local artists’ work on the walls. They’re also working on special, interactive events for both singles (February 7th) and couples (February 14th) in honor of Valentine’s Day.

Looking further into the future, The 5547 Project will focus on local pop art in March and, like the rest of us, they’re anticipating warm weather when they can open their garage doors and hold outdoor events.

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It was in the basement venue, The Casba that I first saw FIGURE. It was dark, no cover, and the place was packed. The sound that came out of the speakers that night cannot be described and neither can the energy of the crowd. I realized then I was witnessing a mad scientist of beats at work.

Figure went on to play IndyMojo’s Identity After Party and was signed to AM Only (largest EDM talent agency) that same week. His career instantly exploded into a welcomed chaos of shows around the world and tons of releases. Since then, he has only played in Indy twice, at The Amber room which he headlined and at Wheelhouse Music Festival.

This coming Altered Thurzday, we can finally announce his return to playing his home state. At none other than the infamous Mousetrap and for only $8 at that. He is bringing his Terrorvision, which is a collaboration of the most terrifying visuals alongside his Monster tracks. This show is years in the making, let’s kick off the year with a bang, bang!

Josh Gard has had a long history in music. Just a few short years ago he donned the name Figure and began making electro house, but has since become a regular name in all realms of electronic and dance. Scoring positions among the charts may have gotten him recognition, but a hefty amount of praise has been raining down on him lately as some of the leading artists in electronic music have valued his live performance skills as some of the best in the business.

In 2011, his Monsters of Drumstep series married his love of horror with his immense production skills to become the soundtrack for the Halloween season. Figure created his own imprint, DOOM Music to house the Monsters series which has now become an annual release. In 2013 FIGURE’s monsters series became the official soundtrack to Universal Studio’s Hollywood Horror Nights theme park.

Figure recently signed with OWSLA to release “Horns of the Apocalypse”. Horns of the Apocalypse showcases FIGURE’S evolving sound and take on 4/4 dance music with his lead single Eagle. War Call & Beast Mode will remind fans of FIGURE’S signature sound. The EP features DEL The Funky Homosapien (Deltron 3030, Gorillaz, Hieroglyphics) Mr Lif (Definitive Jux) & Nick Thayer (Owsla).

“The direction and influence for the production came from being on tour all of last year and a good chunk of of 2013 so far. The entire EP was written on the road but mastered at my home studio in Indiana using my Neve Racks and Abelton. I’m really looking forward to seeing my fans on tour this fall and hope they all love this release as much as I do.” – FIGURE

October 2013 saw the return of FIGURE’s highly acclaimed Monster’s series, with the release of Monsters Volume 4. Monster’s vol. 4 quickly shot up the iTunes/Beatport worldwide charts with key tracks like Are You Afraid Of The Dark ft. Lexi Norton, Living Dead & The Center of Hell ft/ Helicopter Showdown. All in all the album takes listeners on a 13 song trip through the dark world of FIGURE’s monsters, and showcases another side of Josh Gard’s sound design that ties the LP together with dark interludes like Symphony of the Damned & Death’s Gospel.

When he’s not recording in his hometown studios in rural Indiana, Gard is touring worldwide, with packed tents at festivals like EDC, SnowGlobe, Starscape, The Bounce, Creamfields Australia, Tomorrow World, Global Dance, and Belgium’s Dour. He just ended his 14 city Terrorvision Tour in November and Indy will be the 15th city on January 8th!

Local Suport From

HOLLOW POINT


IndyMojo // G-9 Collective // NAP DNB
https://www.facebook.com/djhollowpoint

JIN XS


IndyMojo // G-9 Collective
https://www.facebook.com/TheDJJinxs

INDIGO CHILD

IndyMojo // G-9 Collective
https://www.facebook.com/IndigoChildIndy

Free Shit!

You and a guest will get free entry to the show and a Riot Pack signed by FIGURE.

Rules

1.  Comment below and tell us why you should win!

2.  Share this page to a public post on Facebook tagging 5 friends including Indymojo.com.

3.  If you don’t follow both rules you LOSE!

Winners will be announced January 7th!

January 8th

Mousetrap Bar and Grille

$8

21+

mojo-header

Do you always know where the most happening event is in town?

Do your friends look to you for input when they’re searching for something fun to do?

Do you like to try new things?

Do you appreciate live art and music?

Do you seek out good food, stiff cocktails and heady beer?

If you answer yes to some or all of these questions (and you have experience in journalism or digital content creation), I’d like to discuss the possibility of adding you to our editorial staff at IndyMojo.com. Here are some details about what that might entail.

These are examples of the type of content we produce:

- Event previews

- Artist interviews

- In-depth feature articles (2,000+ words)

- Concert & festival reviews

- Music and event news

The majority of our content is related to music, but we do venture into other relevant topical areas, such as:

- Haunted house reviews

- Sledding hill round-ups

- Coverage of Indy Mojo nonprofit events & activities (e.g. Mutt Strut, Zombie Walk, Polar Plunge)

- Judging performances at the Acoustic LIVE Challenge

- New in 2015: the launch of a local food series

If you have firsthand knowledge of Indianapolis culture and would like a platform to have your voice heard, contributing to IndyMojo.com could be a fun and rewarding experience. The gig pays in concert tickets, endless networking opportunities and increased exposure for your work. Additional benefits include one-on-one mentoring, enhanced communication skills, collaboration opportunities with other writers & a built-in, loyal network of supporters, friends, and family.

rachel hanley indymojoIndy Mojo is the perfect outlet for anyone who the loves art, music, and culture scene rapidly expanding here in Indianapolis. Filled with motivated and friendly individuals, working with Indy Mojo not only helps you spread Indy’s flourishing entertainment scene, but also encourages you to participate in it, too. Go Mojo!

– Rachel Hanley, contributing writer

 

cassidy2I like being part of Indy Mojo because I am passionate about my local music scene. At Indy Mojo you are welcome to be as involved as you like; there’s no pressure to meet quotas. We are also a little family at Mojo; we all have the same interests and passions, so it’s easy to fit in here. You get to meet a lot of people that make things happen around Indy, and you get to know about stuff before it’s public knowledge!

– Cassidy Maley, contributing writer

wes ogden mojoGetting involved with Indy Mojo as a part of the writing team has been a hands-down great experience for me. My favorite parts of the role are free tickets to shows/festivals that I cover and getting to interview some of my favorite artists: Jason Hann (String Cheese Incident/EOTO) and Datsik are a couple personal favorites to date. It’s a great team with solid opportunities that’s led by our editor, Danielle Look. Moral of the story… if you like to write and love music, especially live music, come join the team!

- Wes Ogden, contributing writer

If you’re interested, or know someone who might be, email me at danielle@indymojo.com explaining how you’d like to contribute and what expertise you have that qualifies you no later than February 20th, 2015.

Looking for an internship? Let me know!

resonance lin

We’re less than a week shy from the festival and, man, did it creep up on us. Fall semester has begun, but the leaves are barely changing which means festy season has not reached its conclusion. The weather has been nothing short of perfect lately, and after peeking into next week’s forecast,  temperature forecasts for Pataskala, home of Resonance Festival, are calling for averages in the mid 70’s. Grab a few extra pashminas for the early evening and be sure to layer up later on. Of course, chilly evenings are a solid excuse for mega cuddle puddles. Who doesn’t like cuddle puddles? So let’s talk about this line-up for a second. Two nights of Papadosio and freshly squeezed funk for three days straight?! A dose of Nahko, some Random Rab, and two nights with an Ultraviolet Hippopotamus?!  Forecast also shows that there will be Green skies and bluegrass, and the awesome just keeps on flowing.

Full artist line-up here: http://resonancemusicfest.com/artists

Here’s a few sneak peeks at some of the artists taking the stage next weekend.

Nahko and Medicine for the People FB-ad-Nahko Nahko, an Oregon-native born a mix of Apache, Puerto Rican, and Filipino cultures and adopted into an American family, suffered an identity crisis from an early age. When he took up the piano at age six, the unifying power of music entered his life and brought him harmony.  Armed with his newfound talent, he set out to bridge the cultural gaps dividing his own psyche. He began producing a public, musical journal of his journey toward personal, spiritual, and communal healing, and thus Medicine for the People was born. Recently, Nahko discussed his successes, his philosophies, his music, and his life with Huffington Post, who called Nahko’s music “beautiful and stirring,” comparing him to Bob Marley and proclaiming him a “musical prophet.”

 

Greensky BluegrassGreensky Resonance If you’re familiar with bluegrass music, then you’re tuned in to some of what Greensky Bluegrass does. They’re also known to throw a great party, rock n roll, and (if the critics are to be believed) they have great songs. They are unquestionably a team of friends that traverse the country making music they enjoy. What makes Greensky different than Bluegrass? Poignant rural ballads about real people? Dobro tone that Jerry (Douglas or Garcia) would love? Distortion Pedals? Grit and attitude from a whiskey soaked card game? Indeed, but that’s just the tip of the iceberg.

This quintet from Michigan has been staying up late at all the coolest festivals and stopping to play your favorite clubs and theaters across America for 11 years now. Nearly 175 shows per year has prepared them for the rigorous task of continuity. Greensky Bluegrass isn’t slowing down. “They’re coming to your town to help you party down.” Yeah. Really. Like you never thought possible.

 

PapadosioDosioResonance The information age has a sound. Revolutionary technology meets a evolutionary message in Papadosio. Melding progressive rock with psychedelia, folk with electronica, and dance music with jam, the quintet has amassed a dedicated following of thousands of likeminded individuals sowing the seeds of unity and spreading the sounds of exaltation. Singer-songwriter Anthony Thogmartin’s visionary lyrics,eclectic production, and signature guitar work are anchored by the rock solid battery of drummer Mike Healy and bassist Rob McConnell. The quintet is rounded out by brothers Billy and Sam Brouse, whose virtuosic two-headed keyboard, synth, and programming attack give the band its unmistakable complexity and intensity.

 

It doesn’t stop there. Resonance is offering a pretty sweet VIP deal that includes private sets, t-shirt, limited edition poster, showers, VIP only bathrooms, free firewood, Resonance 2014 limited edition pin and more! 

“Did you say firewood?”

Yes, yes I did. Ground fires are approved for everyone at the festival as long as they are well maintained!!

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Resonance Music Festival: A gathering of like minded, motivated, music loving individuals. 

DATE: October 2 – October 4

LOCATION: Frontier Ranch in Pataskala, Ohio.

Tickets: $110 GA, $200 VIP, and $80 Saturday passes.

Purchase tickets!

$110 for 3 days of unforgettable experiences and 40+ sets. What more could you ask for?! So put on your boogie shoes and get cho’ groove on, son! dosio

Have a passion for photography? Performance arts? Comedy? Local painters? Sculptors? Musicians? Bands? Electronic Artists? All of the above?

If you fall into any of these categories hopefully you made it to Oranje last weekend. For the past twelve years Oranje has strove to “share the talents of a growing creative scene in Indianapolis” and it has succeeded with resounding success. One is always hesitant when approaching an event for the first time that is so hyped. However, the event definitely lived up to the hype. Hosted in and around the Centennial Building at the Indiana State Fairgrounds, the event featured three floors of art exhibits, one music stage on every floor and two outside.

DJ Hollow Point

DJ Hollow Point opened the All-vinyl stage in the Record Lounge.

Each artist was given a certain amount of space to which they were able to do whatever they wanted with the space as long as it didn’t damage the existing structure. As you can imagine, giving artists this type of free rein results in a vibrant and exciting landscape for the night.

Many of the artists had a standard setup with their art displayed on temporary walls. Others took a more interactive approach. For example, artist Quincy Owen who works with many different mediums brought his work in the form of hundreds of drink coasters. He then laid the coasters out in a grid and placed a number of empty drinking glasses sporadically in the grid. You could then pay to take a number of shots with ping pong balls in a beer pong-type fashion. Make a ball in and you get a coaster for free; however, if your attempt was unsuccessful you were, of course, able to purchase the coasters as well.

There were also artists that created their own personal viewing rooms for their work, such as Iggy Arana. A lot of Iggy’s work revolved around using 3D paint on flat surfaces to add another dimension to the work. In order for this dimension to be viewed correctly, part of the exhibit was in a room with special color changing lighting that, in addition to the 3D effect, added a slight moving effect to the pieces as well.

One of my personal favorites was Philip Ramilo a local tattoo artist and painter. Three of his featured works used red and white acrylic paint on a screen similar to what you would see on a screen door. His other paintings on display were very striking and the use of colors and realism made some of the work haunting, even.

Philip Ramilo Screen

One of the Philip Screens featuring accrylic paint on a black screen.

The lower floor of the event played host to a new part of Oranje, the Record Lounge. Local record stores Indy CD & Vinyl and Luna brought in a selection of vinyls, including local artists, for sale. In addition to this the area also featured the all-vinyl DJ stage. From the word “go” this stage featured some serious heavy hitters in the local DJ scene: DJ Hollow Point opened, followed by DJ Indiana Jones, Indy Star A&E reporter David Lindquist moonlighting as a DJ, Cool Hand Lex, and Jin-XS, who closed out the night.

Jin-XS

Jin-XS brought the Vinyl Stage to a close.

The music stage on the main floor was much more compact with each artist getting half an hour to do their thing. Having spent a lot of time exploring and meeting visual artists, I was only able to catch bits and pieces of some of the sets including Anita Vokill, Bangs Nicely, and Indigo Child. The top floor featured a wide range of acts from singer/songwriters to spoken word and comedians.

GypsyMoonshine Oranje

Local Group Gypsy Moonshine on the Accoustic Stage.

Outside on the main stage I was able to catch most of the Shadeland set. Shadeland is a local band that consists of vocalist and guitarist Allen Kell, bassist and vocalist Tony Vibbert, keyboardist Jacob Zimmerman, and drummer Brad Hudgins. They are a true local band that has been active in some form or another for at least 15 years. This writer remembers seeing them at a battle of the bands event at the Fountain Square Theatre under a different moniker sometime around 2000, long before Fountain Square had been built up to its current state.

Bringing a close the main stage, Midwest Hype brought the same high caliber of performance that they are known for. By the time their set started, the crowd had started to die down a bit, but the energy was high and those still in attendance got down to their funky, powerful sound.

Check out our review of Midwest Hype’s latest album The Time is Now here.

Midwest Hype

Midwest Hype closing out the Main Stage.

Ghosthouse on the tent stage brought amazing energy as witnessed by their pre-performance huddle session reminiscent of many “hands in” moments you see prior to sporting events. Closing out the night in spectacular fashion, duo Mutiny had the crowd with them until the very end.

My only small complaint about Oranje was that there was so much going on you were guaranteed to miss something amazing. Although that is not even close to being a bad thing as you are going to be completely inundated with all the culture you could handle in one short five hour period. If you missed Oranje this year make sure to be there next year. It will be worth your time and money.

10506967_10152627004947300_5561443072008087822_o Never miss a Werkout; after all, it’s for your health. The Werkout, a 3-day event filled with music, art, and all things silly, took place from August 7th-9th in Thornville, OH. An oasis of wonder and shenanigans, what more could one ask for?

After spending the time of our lives at Legends Valley, we set upon the task of reviewing the festival, recounting it for those who were there and recapping it for those who weren’t.

How to boil it down? Condensing 72 hours of bliss into simple text on a screen can be a challenge, but we’ve debated and discussed, recalled and reminisced, and this is the result. A list of 10 moments, bands, people, and situations to paint the picture of the Werkout.

10. The Comedy Stylings of Mr. Jesse Brown AKA The Blue Power Ranger

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Jesse Brown (Left) and Johnathan Blackburn (Right) in front of the Furthur Bus at The Werkout 2014 (Photo: Gloria Ponciano)

Amusing would be an understatement had you met this gentleman moseying through the grounds on Saturday night. This guy was the real deal from the costume to his swift reenactment of “It’s morphin time!”  He was a true entertainer, as most witnesses would say. His comical gestures and witty dialogue were the perfect way to transition from one set to another.  I walked out of the situation with stomach cramps because I was laughing so hard. Werkout citizen Kenny Beebe went on to describe him as “Eloquent. He just kept on going forever. I didn’t want him to stop talking. This guy had to be a professional; he really put on a show.”

Jesse, if you’re out there and ever decide to go on tour just know that you’ve got yourself plenty of fans.

9. El Fuego

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Enchanting fire breathing displayed during Zoogma’s Saturday night set at The Werkout 2014 (Photo: Aaron Lingenfelter)

A non-musical, yet integral, part of the festival were the performance artists throughout the weekend.   Nestled near the stages was a performance area set up specifically for performance artists of all kinds: hoopers, poi spinners, fire breathers and more. Performances of this kind are not uncommon to festivals by any means; in fact, they’re almost as expected as music is. However, Saturday’s events were something special.

As nightfall came and Zoogma tore through their incendiary set, fire performers captivated throngs of audience members with their craft. The performers worked three at a time, joining forces to create choreographed masterpieces of movement and light. Bright flames circled around on smooth trajectories, tearing beautiful patterns into the cool night air. It was mesmerizing. It was unreal.

Honorable mention: Fire cannons. Specifying further, computer-controlled, propane-fueledfire-cannons… with whistles to boot! Who knows what to officially call these contraptions; they shot short blasts of gas through an exhaust whistle and past an igniter. Epic. But… why, you may ask? Because that shit is awesome.

8. Ultraviolet Hippopotamus’ Saturday Night Special

Making the list of incredible performances to hit The Werkout on Saturday night was UV Hippo’s groovy performance. Always blistering and always on point, the band set the evening vibe right with their second set of the extended weekend. Starting out with the soothing and surreal, “Medicine”, Hippo amped up the energy track after track for the duration of their hour-long set. Moving through a 6-song set bordering on an average of 10 minutes a song they jammed their way through as only Hippo can do. The result? A meandering trail of color-clad humanoids dancing their way throughout the venue.

Set List:  Medicine > Verlander, Georgie (w/ Kenn Mogel on guitar), DNT, Tugboat, La Marea

Stream or download the entire set here

7. The Werks’ Two Sets on Saturday

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The Werks getin down Saturday Night at The Werkout 2014 (Photo: Aaron Lingenfelter)

The Werks kept fans at attention with every beat of the night, hitting all of the right notes throughout both sets. They even brought the staff and production crew on stage for a solid moment of recognition; a grand round of applause. Zane Kesey and Derek Stevens from the Further bus did a narrative for the Anniversary of Jerry Garcia’s death. Dave Weissman, the festival’s media organizer, and his son even joined the stage; dressed in galactic space wear (complete with capes), they played air guitar during the last song.

Setlist

Set One
Guido
Drop
Plain White Toast
Hard To Find Jam
Better Half
Fire Eater
Gameplan.

Set Two
For You
Galactic Passport
Cryptical Envelopment
The Other One
Rollin’

Stream or download the entire set here

6. The Furthur Bus

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Furthur bus posted up at The Werkout 2014 (Photo: Aaron Lingenfelter)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Zane Kesey (the son of famed author Ken Kesey), Derek Stevens, and the next generation of pranksters made their way to The Werkout on their 50th anniversary tour. The bus, a beautiful piece of art and history on wheels was a one stop shop for fun, games, merch, and even a wedding! The Werk Out was the 6th official stop on their tour outside of their initial travels in Oregon in June.  I had the pleasure of speaking to Derek over the phone to ask a few questions, detailing their experiences on the road.  

How did the Werk Out become so lucky to be one of the stops of the tour?

“Actually, we were privileged enough to be invited by Rob Chafin of the Werks. I had the pleasure of talking to him over the phone a few times, and he said that they were trying to plan something special for us out there and said he’d appreciate it if we could make it.”

Is it safe to say that the Werks was probably your favorite gig out there?

“Without a doubt. The Werks were on top of it, it was a great gig across the board. They really stepped it up.”

Were there any other bands that caught your attention?

Actually to be honest I didn’t make it out on the grounds to explore very much until late night but hands down Zach Deputy. We had him on the bus, a little private recording session, and he just blew us all away.”

Is there any advice that you want to share with the youth of America and next generation of merry panksters?

“Best thing to keep in mind is that it’s okay to think differently. It’s okay to express yourself with music and art. Whatever it is that brings up your passion…. We’re not saying to tune in, turn on and drop out by any means. We don’t even roll like that anymore, especially right now on tour. You can be high on the hill but you end up missing those little things, you know? Be you and have fun. It’s okay to be yourself. You don’t have to go down any set path to be free and have fun. It’s all about living in the moment and not missing those little things.”

He went on to share a few intimate moments they had along the tour and added, “It’s those stories that color what this entire experience is about. You know, we actually had an opportunity to get – and I’d hate to mention it – corporate sponsors, but we turned it down. It didn’t feel right not having the bus on the road interacting with people. That’s not what this bus was about and we’re glad that we didn’t. We’ve made so many friends – lifelong friends – along the way.”

Next stop on the Bus tour will be in Baltimore, MD at The 8×10 room with special guest John Kadlecik of Furthur this Tuesday, August 19.

Check out more tour dates here

5. The Werks’ Stripped Down VIP Set/Q&A Meet and Greet

This may have not been a part of the main festival, and it wasn’t accessible for everyone, but it definitely deserves to be on the list. As a part of the VIP ticket package for The Werkout, ticketholders were treated with a special set from The Werks in the VIP lounge. Relaxed and laid back, it gave audience members a chance to see the band and interact with them in an uncommonly intimate setting. The session started with a heartfelt thank you from The Werks, detailing how fans and supporters are truly the reason that events like The Werkout exist. It felt good.

Seated among a group of spectators, The Werks played several stripped down songs including a new and yet-to-be released tune. They told stories and joked around. It was comfortable and enjoyable. After the short performance, they moved on to a Q&A session with the audience, prompting us to ask anything about the band, the festival, or whatever else was on our mind.

The shining moment of the Q&A session, you ask? They announced that there were 7 cinematographers filming Thursday’s Dark Side performance. The kicker? The soundboard audio and video of the set will be edited and released, FOR FREE, in several weeks once the project is completed. Another tasty tidbit? Anthony Thogmartin of Papadosio is mastering the audio. The days can’t tick by fast enough.

4. Everyone Orchestra

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Matt Butler in his slick get up during Everyone Orchestra at The Werkout 2014 (Photo: Aaron Lingenfelter)

For those who don’t know, Everyone Orchestra is the ever changing, improvisational, brainchild of musician Matt Butler. Boiled down to its core, it’s a jam session, but not just any old jam. Featuring a rotating cast of some of the world’s top musicians (past participants have included members of The Grateful Dead, Phish, moe., String Cheese Incident, Taj Mahal, a presidential candidate and more).

For The Werkout’s incarnation, EO was a 14-piece band creating brass-laden funk fusion with Butler manning the helm as the Orchestra’s psychedelic conductor. He guided the group of musicians toward their auditory goal, creating and closing sonic space as he sees fit. As any musician will tell you, that’s easier said than done, especially with 14 people improvising at a time. Butler guided the group through the jam using vocal cues, hand gestures, and a little whiteboard that he feverishly scribbles directions to the musicians on. It truly is an awesome and silly sight of madness and music.

Stream or Download the set here

3. Zoogma’s Saturday Night Set

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WTF is a Zoogma? Saturday night set at the Werkout 2014 (Photo: Aaron Lingenfelter)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 4-piece livetronica outfit hailing from Oxford, Mississippi, took no prisoners with Saturday’s set at The Werkout festival, their second overall performance of the weekend. Sandwiched between The Werks’ two sets that night, they had some big shoes to fill. Zoogma pulled through with what may have been the most talked about set of the weekend.

As the last notes of The Werks’ first set tapered off, the bass took hold from the opposite stage… and so it began. Contrasting the stylings of the previous act’s more traditional sound, Zoogma was a swirling synthesis of organic and electronic instrumentation. Wasting no time and starting things off with a bang, they launched into what can only be described as an electro-blues banger. “Let My Shorty Ride (RL Burnside x Young Buck)”, a seamless blend of hip-hop and righteous gritty slide guitar, foreshadowed what was to come over the course of their set: an eclectic mix of originals and reworkings of a slew of other tracks.

Additional highlights of the set were the Michael Jackson and Eagles classics “Thriller” and “Hotel Crunkafornia (Notorious B.I.G. x The Eagles)”, respectively. For those of you who weren’t there, let’s get one thing straight: these were not simply covers, but incredibly solid and innovative rehashes of the original masterpieces. One has never heard such guitar playing like this during a “Thriller” performance, guaranteed.

As “Thriller” climaxed in one final intensifying crescendo, a surprise awaited, the opening notes to “Hotel California” rang out, soon to be layered in with some Biggie vocals. Intriguing? Damn straight. With dueling guitars and saw-bass low-end, Zoogma soared on this one; imagine Joe Walsh and Don Felder duking it out on the famous solo, but only that this time through they had discovered the glory of Ableton before writing the track. Hands. Down. Breathtaking.

Setlist

Let My Shorty Ride
Mirage
Jerry Diesel
Starrey Eyed Thriller
Hotel Crunkifornia
Jaguar
M10

Stream or Download the full set here

2. Zach Deputy

The one-man-band from Savannah, GA that kept on keepin’ on! It was almost impossible to keep from ‘to his funky tunes, even if you were just passing through for that midafternoon delight. Had the dance floor not been made of rocks, people surely would have kicked off their boogie shoes! The guitar was funky with a few flicks of beat boxing here and there and Deputy laid down smooth, soulful, swingin’ vocals. This man would have you down in New Orleans one minute then out with island fever the next.

Deputy made sure to engage the audience throughout his set to enhance the vibe and step up the jive. He kept the loop train going all throughout Friday and Saturday night, even on into Sunday morning. Even the schedule didn’t know what time he would be done! Embracing his collaborative spirit, he also provided  vocals during the Dark Side and Everyone Orchestra sets as well. What ‘chu know ‘bout The Deputy?!

1. And the downright obvious of the all things epic: Dark Side of the Werk Out set!

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Epic Dark Side of the Werkout Set with The Werks, Papadosio, and Dopapod (Photo: Joe Chung)

What an incredible way to bring in the first night of the festival.  There was so much zest and excitement in the air leading up to this set of epic wonder. By the time The Werks ended their last song of their first set the crowd had swelled up. One could feel the intensity and the anticipation for what was about to take place – the fifteen minute set change seemed to take forever.

Finally, each band member took their place and the lights dimmed to their appropriate state. The crowd cheered louder with every pulse that lead into the sudden stroke of “Breathe”, and then the pack got wild! Chills are currently pacing their way up and down this writer’s spine just reliving that moment. And who better to open up the tribute other than the festival director and beat master of The Werks himself, Rob Chafin.

As if the Dark Side set wasn’t enough, more surprises made their way into this grand recital. Kevin Dumont laid down the smooth and saxxy melodies during “Money.” The enchanting vocals of Mr. Zach Deputy were brought in for “Great Gig in the Sky”, and, boy did that man bring a few people down to their knees! Making their way through the crowd at that moment was the full cast of Wizard of Oz, even the Lollipop Guild, as the movie played on the backdrop. Overall, it was an inspiring sight to behold.

There it is, the Werkout in review. While this isn’t an all-inclusive list or even the big picture of what went down that weekend, it’s our little version. Short and condensed, just add water – or beer – to reconstitute. Given the chance, would we go again? Yes. As for you, the reader, should you consider it next year? That’s not for us to say, but, if this article was met with intrigue and a peaked interest, you probably already know the answer to that question.

Want more pictures? 
The Werkout 2014 with Aaron Lingenfelter
The Werkout 2014 with Joe Chung

EXCISION w/ Dirtyphonics & Ill Gates @ Old National Centre

EXCISION

 

Jeff Abel AKA Excision Hails from Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada. He frequently works with fellow Canadian producers Datsik and Downlink. Along with Downlink, he is the founder of Rottun Recordings. Active since 2004, his first release was in 2007. He had released an annual “Shambhala” mix album in the third quarter of each year. He also is known for his watts of bass tours. This new tour brings once again his “Executioner” video and light production. This time around, he brings a new 150,000 watt bass system from PK Sound

Abel recently founded another label “Destroid Records”, upon its debut release a full length digital album was released with the majority of tracks by Excision himself and collaborations with other artists such as Downlink, Space Laces, Far Too Loud, Bassnectar and Ajapai. Another single was released in December 2013 by Excision & Space Laces entitled “Get Stupid”. There are more releases scheduled to be released on Destroid Records. In January he released a free downlowd with Downlink entitled “Rock You”. Check them both out below.


 

DIRTYPHONICS

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Dirtyphonics is a French electronic music group from Paris, formed by Charly, Thomas, and Pho in 2004 and joined by Pitchin in 2009. Their music style is based on Electro, Dubstep, Drumstep, and Drum and Bass. In 2008, Dirtyphonics was originally signed on Shimon’s label AudioPorn Records. After releasing remixes on many labels, such as Mau5trap, Cooking Vinyl, Ram, MTA, Ultra Records, they joined Dim Mak Records in 2012. Dirtyphonics has worked with Linkin Park, Skrillex, Kaskade, Benny Benassi, Foreign Beggars, NERO, Modestep, Steve Aoki, Marilyn Manson, and many more through collaborations and remixes.

On March 19, 2013, Dirtyphonics released their debut full-length album Irreverence which merges heavy bass music, drum and bass, dubstep, and electro. The first single from the album, “Dirty,” was released in October 2012, followed by “Walk In The Fire,” “No Stopping Us,” and “Hanging On Me” in 2013 with remixes covering most genres of electronic music. In early 2014, Thomas quit the band to become a painter known as Matheo de Bruvisso

 ill.Gates

ill.Gates is a Toronto-based composer, performer and educator. Over the past 16 years, he has established a global fan base and a reputation as one of the most dynamic electronic music artists around. He regularly tours across North America, Europe, Australia and Asia. Gates has headlined at such festivals as Burning Man, Shambala, the World Electronic Music Festival and the New Orleans Jazz Festival. His first full-length release, Autopirate (Muti Music, 2008) charted and continues to sell strongly. His upcoming triple album The ill.Methodology and accompanying online course are highly anticipated. Gates was recently selected as one of the Next 100 by URB Magazine.

Many of his contemporaries cite ill.Gates as a key artistic influence and inspiration in their music. While on tour, Gates frequently teaches workshops to grateful and attentive audiences, in which he shares his highly effective approach to producing quality finished music as well as insights into the mentality and strategies necessary to succeed in the music business.

 

Egyptian Room at Old National Centre
502 N New Jersey St
Indianapolis, IN 46204

-ALL AGES-

Get tickets: http://bit.ly/17VIY80

Having no real idea of what her final product will look like, artist Julie Young likes to start her drawings with a permanent ink, making it impossible to erase the lines.

“This leaves me stuck with the marks I have made,” Young says. “Just like your actions do in everyday life.”

Julie for Mojo 2

Julie Young live painting at Hyperion.

“Working in permanent ink encourages me to continue moving forward with the piece, letting myself and the piece grow together at the same time. As I am working on a piece, I can see the infinite depth of space and possibilities to create in. I am painting or drawing, I can look around on the canvas or paper and see a whole other world; my world of imagination; the world that is inside my mind.

 

Most often once I layout the image in ink, I begin to fill the piece in with bright vivid colors. With a combination of intuition and color theory knowledge, I choose colors to contrast each other, bringing certain parts of the piece forward to grab the viewers’ attention.

 

I mostly paint with acrylics, and blend the colors directly on the canvas instead of mixing them in a pallet before hand. I’m not a clean painter at all; I tend to get paint all over my self and my outfit.

 

A lot of the times I like to hide things like small images, symbols, or words in the small details of the paintings. Once I feel that the piece is complete, I will add a layer of varnish over the top to protect the piece and give it a glossy finish.” – Julie Young

 

Young, 22-year-old artist located in Indianapolis has always been aware of her artistic abilities. At four years of age, Young found herself glued to the television, fixated on her favorite TV show at the time, Pappyland.

“I can say that I started making finished pieces when I was like 4 or 5,” Young says. “Pappyland taught me how to draw, step by step, and how to finish a whole picture.”

From this point forward, Young knew she was an artist.For Mojo 1 Julie Throughout childhood, Young was picked for exclusive art programs through school, which kept her interested in art, and continued to challenge her artistic skills.

“Back then I was mainly drawing, doodling fake creatures with 30 eyeballs and wings,” Young laughs.

Young still enjoys creating interesting characters and stories with her drawings and paintings, pulling inspiration from everyday people and everyday interactions.

“I’ll just sit down somewhere and observe people and observe their odd situations and I’ll make up stories in my head, and then that will somehow come out into a painting, whether it’s some energy I got from them, or some actual situation, or, ‘That’s a really goofy-ass looking guy; I’m gonna draw him.’”

As Young has matured into a young woman, her artwork has also matured. Lately, she has been drawn to metaphysics and has incorporated metaphysical undertones in many of her latest pieces.

“I’ve pulled a lot from all the lessons I’ve learned in metaphysics; how to concentrate and how to use my imagination more,” she says. “I’m starting to try to put that even more into my paintings, so hopefully other people can look at it and start to grasp some concepts of the connection of the soul, the mind and dreams.”

Flyer for Julie's March 7th event.

Flyer for Julie’s March 7th event.

Young tries to stay busy and has been offered many opportunities to showcase her work and the work of others this year. On March 7th, she will curate the art and music show Not Just Skin, at the Fountain Square Brewing Company- the first show Young is putting together herself.

“The show will include art from a handful of different tattoo artists; 15 artists from 10 shops total. It should be a lot of fun!”

Not Just Skin will also include performances from the bands Stranger, and Like Smoke.

Young’s proudest moment as an artist was when she received the confirmation of her next big show. On July 4th of this year, Young will have her very first solo show at the Upland Propaganda Studio in the Murphy Art Center. As of right now, she is torn between two ideas, which are both instrumental influences in her artwork.

“I want to either do a circus series of drawings and paintings, or an entire show that focuses on metaphysics!” Young says.

Additionally, Young’s newest platform for presenting her art is live painting. After being a part of Hyperion Julie for mojo 4for the past two years, she was asked to live-paint at a winter version of Hyperion at the Vogue Theatre, and the experience has forever left an impression on her.

“It’s just so great to feed off of everyone’s energy around you. Everyone at Hyperion is like family.”

Having accomplished so much at such an early stage of her career, Young knows that she is beating the odds. After dropping out of Herron art school in the second semester of her freshman year, Young wanted to prove to herself and those around her that it is not necessary to have a degree in art to become successful.

“I was looking in the mirror this morning and I just thought, ‘Julie, you have worked your ass off so hard these past two years, and finally something is showing for it’,” she says. “Just knowing that I am doing something right is very satisfying for me.”

Young’s art will only continue to evolve. With her hard work and dedication to creating all the interesting subjects that pop in her head, Young is a must-see artist this summer.

For updates on Julie Young’s artwork and upcoming shows, click here!

 

Do you guys remember Mojostock last year? Well not all of it, but no one can forget Terravita smashing their bass in your face Saturday night. Well you are in luck because they are coming back to Indy this Saturday at The Deluxe @ Old National.

Terravita is Matt Simmers (Production Engineer), Jon Spero (Mic Expert), and Chris Barlow (Mix Master). Together they are a force that has been a hard hitter in the bass scene for over ten years and counting. They have seen all the major transitions that the genre has encountered along the way.

I got the chance to have a phone conversation with Chris Barlow. I asked him a little more about the group and got some of his ideas on bass music and where it is heading. This Saturday should be an amazing show from what he was telling me.

 

Track Hound: Where did the name Terravita come from? It means living earth right?

Chris: It means earth life. We thought it was pretty cool. We are all earth life, plants are earth life, there’s a God force behind everything on the earth and it symbolizes our meaning

TH: What brought you guys together to start creating drum and bass?

Chris: Matt and I were working together DJing, producing and doing events. We were working with one MC and he showed up to a studio session hammered one day. He started telling us we sucked and didn’t know how to produce, so we got rid of him and started doing shows with Jon. Although he gets drunk pretty often he has never done that, so we are stuck with him now 10 years later. (Jon is saying in the background “Go fuck yourself”)

TH: What is your opinion of the change in bass music now versus 10 years ago?

Chris: We’ve seen in those 10 years, predominately vinyl sales and printed media, go all the way to MP3 sales exclusively, nobody really presses vinyl anymore. More people give out tracks and we are dealing with the internet which means trends can change really fast. Stuff can get really popular without a huge dollar amount invested. What’s cool about that is that fans can speak a bit more about what they like, which is nice, but also sucks because you have everyone who is a critic. Upside to it is you can be getting a lot of plays and shares and getting people to want your music, which builds your social media and makes you popular. It also makes it easier to make the music you want to make, instead of depending on A&R at a label to like it or get positive reviews from critics. It also makes it more possible to get a record store to showcase it so people will buy it. It allows us to be more creative. For instance back when we were doing Drum and Bass, you could only be between 172 and 176 BPM and it had to be a different drum and bass beat. Which is cool, we love Drum n Bass and we are writing a lot more of it now. It’s nice to have bass music cycle through dubstep (various forms), even trap, moombahton, drumstep, and glitch-hop. It’s all bass music, all in the same family and gives us more freedom musically. It lets us think outside the box with different beat structures and different BPMs. There is only so much you can do in a genre that’s been around like 7 years when you are limited to the same perimeters. It’s nice to have a change-up. Between the different trends and file sharing it creates a lot less barriers between you and the fans.

TH: On that same note, The EDM scene has seen a growth of a different genre each year the past few years starting with dubstep then drumstep then moombahton, then trap. What do you foresee being the next big thing in EDM?

Chris: It’s funny that you just mentioned a whole bunch of genres. When you think of the term EDM, none of those compare to trance and progressive house or even make a dent in EDM. EDM is festival house music. For instance, Swedish House Mafia (vocal progressive house) and Armin Van Buuren (trance). Those genres are still relatively underground. Artists who make bass music, while they are playing big crowds compared to what they were in the past, are still only playing to 2,000 – 3,000 people shows on tours. That’s still only like Slayer (metal band) size, which is still underground. Slayer is not a crossover commercial heavy metal by any means. I would say that none of those genres were the next big thing in EDM. That being said, in the more underground genres of EDM that you mentioned, I think the cool thing now is to not actually be of a certain genre. Play a little bit of everything. (Jon is saying “You have a whole artists space coming up”). When you think about an artist like Excision, you go to his show and he will play like 20 minutes of dubstep. The rest of it is electro house, drum n bass, drumstep, and 110. People play all over the place. It’s cool because artists sounds can come across in multiple genres not just one at one BPM, that’s boring. My prediction is that people will be more free and open with what they do. We will see Drum and Bass come back a little bit and the harder-edge electro House is due for a comeback as well.

TH: You guys have an electro house side project right? Hot Pink Delorean?

Chris: I wouldn’t say have, I’d say had. At this point there are no plans for Hot Pink Delorean, we are tied up with Terravita releases and touring and are booked through 2015. Not saying they will never come back, we just had to choose what group to focus on and we didn’t like the way some of the electro was going creatively. We didn’t want to swim upstream.

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TH: How do you work together when you all can’t be together in every studio session?

Chris: Matt is the main production engineer and Jon does the vocals. We get together when we can and bend stuff around when we have too. Lately we have decided to stop touring by airplane and are doing it by ground, which allows us to all be together. It’s allowing us to do a whole new show. We’re not Djing these shows, we doing little samplers and playing from remix decks. It’s new and a little crazy but allows us to play through a lot more tracks. Right now we are playing through somewhere around 90 tracks in an hour and a half. We are also playing parts of some of those live. It allows us to do that and be together on the road while we are making music.

TH: How do you prepare for your live tours?

Chris: We get together and come up with a set. We try to incorporate what songs go where and practice. We try to incorporate music from other genres including Jimmy Hendrix etc., all different kinds.

“Never write something like “I’m a 16 year old whatever producer from wherever. This is my first song. Can you listen to it?” Don’t bother if you’re 16, wait six years and send it to me when you’re really awesome.”

 

TH: What’s your favorite and least favorite thing about being on the road?

Chris: Favorite thing – Getting to play our music in front of our fans.
Least Favorite – Driving and flying and being away from home.

It’s a pretty sweet two or three hours a night when you are playing. But when you are sitting in Holton, Kansas at a Days Inn which is the next hotel in 45 miles in both directions and all there is to eat is whatever is at the truck stop, that’s our least favorite thing about touring.

TH: If you had to give up music, what would be your go to occupation?

Chris: I have a degree in Entrepreneurship, so it would be something business related. I would probably end up somewhere in the music industry behind a desk instead of in front of the crowd. Jon would probably end up opening a restaurant or a bar. He was in the food industry for a while. I have no clue what Matt would do.

TH: We have been seeing a lot of DJ and Producer schools popping up everywhere. What is your advice for up and coming performers?

Chris: Learn how to make music and learn from as many reliable sources as possible. Never send out your music until it’s done and it’s as good as the artists that you look up to. If it’s not, then it’s going to get one listen and people are going to label you in their minds as someone they don’t need to listen too. It’s hard to shake that label. Try to find the proper channels to get people your music instead of spamming their Facebook or sending them a message on Soundcloud. The people that are worth sending your music to get so much of other peoples music that they just won’t even listen to it. You have to get it in the right hands of the right people in the right way. Make sure it’s done before you give it to them. Never write something like “I’m a 16 year old whatever producer from wherever. This is my first song. Can you listen to it?” Don’t bother if you’re 16, wait six years and send it to me when you’re really awesome. There’s no rush and everyone needs to realize that. Collect as much info as possible before even bothering to move ahead.

TH: You were the headliner for Mojostock last year. Can you share the most memorable thing about that show?

Chris: Definitely the crowd, everyone reacted to every track. We had never been there before so we didn’t know what to expect. It was great to see a nice family vibe and the promoters were professional. Sound was good and stage looked nice. We had a great time, the whole thing was great. We had a choice to stick around after we played and we chose to stay for like the whole night. You know the headliner of the festival likes it if they are kicking it by the campfire 10 beers deep by the end of the night.

TH: What super power would you have if you could only have it for 24 hours?

Chris: The ability to give myself more super powers.

Jon: Teleportation, I would be loaded. I would rob every single bank in 24 hours.

TH: What does Terrivita have in store for us in 2014?

Chris: We’ve got Rituals coming out. We are working with the metal band Born of Osiris, which should be after that. We have some collaborations with Datsik, Bassnectar, La Castlevania, Figure, J. Rabbit, Getter, and the Firepower people. We have so many of our own projects going on, it makes it hard to sit down with people, especially when you start working with something like a metal band. Going forward we are trying to take the act a little more live by the later part of 2014, adding guitars and keyboards.

TH: What can we expect February 1st here in Indy?

Chris: My birthday is February 2nd and I will probably get really drunk, so there’s that. It should be really good for Robot Pirate Monkey who is opening for us. You should expect them to really vibe it out. We are going to do our thing with our samplers. You will hear some stuff off of Rituals, you’ll hear that Datsikcollab, and a bunch of our new stuff. We are making music as we go, so you might be in store for things we haven’t played out before. We are looking forward to getting back there.

We’ll there you have it. I hope to see all of you this Saturday night. I am really eager to check out Robot Pirate Monkey and see Terravita perform in their new style. Check out some tracks from both groups below.

Facebook Event Page

Tickets are available here —–> TICKETS!

You can also get tickets from IndyMojo at this week’s Altered Thurzday for only $15